#MenOfTheWeb We Chat With Robin Moore (@RobinMooreXXX)

We had the tremendous joy of exchanging some words with the astonishing Robin Moore. He’s a superstar form Helix Studios and tells us some amazing stories about his past, the ancient past, and current LGBTQ concerns. Check him out at on Twitter (and of course his work at Helix and elsewhere)—but, after you read this.

“The kanji for metal also means money. It looks like a little house with bags of rice leaning against the walls.”— Robin

“They need to know it’s ok not to feel cisgender or straight. They need to know they can be bisexual, gender-fluid, asexual, or anything else they feel like.”— Robin

What are some media recommendations you have?

For shows, I would need to say House of Cards hands down because it’s a masterpiece. For games, I would say the Dragon Age franchise pretty awesome all around, but the Witcher 3 is an amazing experience of just one game, but I haven’t played any of the others. If you’re feeling adventurous or nostalgic, there is an amazing JRPG from the PS2 that is pure fun and a great story called Rogue Galaxy, check it out, it’s great.

You told us you love learning other languages. Do you have any tips for people trying to learn a new language?

So, I want to learn languages because I find it really fun and I also didn’t have the time or money for college to become a psychologist. Naturally loving and understanding psychology is actually an amazing thing for learning a language.

When I get confused about something (especially with Japanese and their confusing but sophisticated kanji) I always remember a trick to help myself understand and connect the dots. Languages and communication are formed from the cultures they come from. You need to think like the people from that language for something to make sense. Ask yourself “Why do they word it like this?” and that will help you make sense of what is stumping you.

The kanji for metal also means money. It looks like a little house with bags of rice leaning against the walls. Rice was used as currency for a period of time. Thus, the storehouse of rice was used as a kanji for metal and money. It’s all about putting yourself in the shoes of the culture the language came from.

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What is your favorite part of gay history to research about?

Mostly sexuality in Greek, Roman, and feudal Japanese society. While not all of their practices would be appropriate modern society, sexuality in those times and cultures were certainly fascinating and we could learn a thing or 2 as a society about acceptance of gender and sexual orientation from those times. They are just really interesting periods for queer cultural history.

What do you think is the biggest issue in the LGBTQ community and how do you think we can fix it?

Growing up in small towns in Kansas, the only time that I was ever exposed or in an open environment for gender and sexual orientation was when I joined the Pride club in college. For many people in the big cities or along the coast, lots have it good, but in many parts of the country and certainly the world, many people don’t get resources about gender and sexuality letting them know it’s ok to be different until after they are 18 or maybe even into their 20’s.

I’m pretty messed up in the head for not being myself when I was a young child. So many people grow up and need to play catch up from their childhood not being who they were because their families and communities never told them it was ok to be different. I think we need to have a presence anywhere and everywhere there are people and children need resources and education.

They need to know it’s ok not to feel cisgender or straight. They need to know they can be bisexual, gender-fluid, asexual, or anything else they feel like. If they don’t know yet, we should certainly help them figure it out. One of the worst things in the world is growing up as someone you’re not. It’s hell.

If your life were to be a TV Show, what would it be and what role would you play?

I would be Francis J. Underwood in House of Cards. I want to find my Claire and rule the world together. :]

“I am attractive and beautiful in my own way and I was never the hot guy, ever.”— Robin

“When you meet another LGBT person on the street, you feel it. “— Robin

“So many people grow up and need to play catch up from their childhood not being who they were because their families and communities never told them it was ok to be different.”— Robin

You said you want to delve deeper into the sex Industry, what is the next big move that you can share with us?

I’m not sure yet. I’m keeping my eyes open, though. I always say that if I had the coordination, I would love to try go-go dancing, that would be really fun. Other than that, it might be nice to find a studio that I really like the content and the people there and maybe work for a studio or work closely with. Might be nice to settle somewhere and really be a part of making the content in other ways than just modeling, but I don’t plan on quitting modeling for a couple years at the very least.

Other than that, it might be nice to find a studio that I really like the content and the people there and maybe work for a studio or work closely with. Might be nice to settle somewhere and really be a part of making the content in other ways than just modeling, but I don’t plan on quitting modeling for a couple years at the very least.

Tell us a story about an experience that changed you as a person.

So, years ago, I was a lot different. Right after I left the house to live on my own, I tried to be more of myself since I really wasn’t all of my childhood. I looked a lot different. I wasn’t in as good of shape, my hair was much longer, I wore different clothes, everything. I was the guy on Grindr people ghosted after receiving pictures.

Fast forward to about a year ago or before I went to Helix. I was with my partner whom we recently separated, yet we are still good friends. So, I worked as a carpet cleaner at a very reputable company, but they were all older guys, mostly conservative. They all harassed me and treated me like shit daily.

I had very few friends. I enjoyed the job, but it did often suck and the coworkers made it hell. At this time my partner was helping me be more in touch with myself. I started expressing myself more and getting more in shape. By this time I started keeping my hair shorter.

One night, I just really felt fed up with how they treated me. I just had a casual conversation with my partner about porn stars and how they made so much money for nothing. She just casually told me I could do it. I didn’t believe her, but I was like “fuck it”. So, I found Helix. They seemed reputable with attractive guys. So, I applied.

I talked with them a week later and they had me out sometime after. It was an amazingly surreal experience. Really fun stuff I’ve never tried before, being treated like a rock star. I was in awe of how people saw me. Tons of people saw me as a 10.

At that moment, I realized after all of this reshaping of myself, I may still want to go further, but I am attractive and beautiful in my own way and I was never the hot guy, ever. People swoon over me and it still today is the difference of night and day to me. That experience was the one that made all the difference, though. I’ll never forget it.

What does being gay mean to you?

It’s hard to say. In some ways, I’m stereotypically gay. In others, I’m not. This was a probably a product of me not being around queer culture, just my little communities where I grew up.

When I came out, I always HATED when my friends said I wasn’t gay. I still didn’t know myself. I tried so hard to be stereotypically gay or be gay in any way I could to claim that identity as my own. These days, people see both sides of me and sometimes think I’m gay, sometimes not.

Being gay to me is just liking male bodies or genders. Being gay is special, but I think the real special thing is to identify as queer or LGBT+ in general. There is a sense of community and openness and acceptance. We welcome everyone and even straight and cisgender people, but it’s still different.

When you meet another LGBT person on the street, you feel it. You both know or understand the struggles of not being like the rest in ways that non-LGBT people might never understand.

What being LGBT is to me is going up to someone, learning about who they are and whatever that might be, I will say “Oh cool” as if everyone is different and the rainbow is normal. Being open to absolutely anything.

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